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Quintessence Publishing: Journals: QI
Quintessence International

Edited by Eli Eliav

ISSN 0033-6572 (print) • ISSN 1936-7163 (online)

Publication:
April 1994
Volume 25 , Issue 4

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Pulpal response to adhesive resin systems applied to acid- etched vital dentin: Damp versus dry primer application

White/Cox/Kanca III/Dixon/Farmer/Snuggs

Pages: 259-268
PMID: 8058899

A number of studies have reported that acid etching of dentin is toxic to the cells of the odontoblastic layer and dental pulp. Other studies report that pulpal inflammation is a consequence of bacterial microleakage. The purpose of this study was to observe the degree of pulpal healing after pretreatment of vital dentin prior to placement of All-Bond and Scotch-bond 2 composite resin adhesives. Zinc oxide-eugenol cement and an acidic cement were employed as controls. One hundred twelve Class V nonexposed cavity preparations were placed throughout the dentitions of five healthy adult rhesus monkeys and observed at 3, 25, and 80 days. Various dentinal pretreatment procedures were employed. The All-Bond Universal primer system was placed on air-dried vital dentin in 23 cavities and on damp vital dentin in 27 cavities. Scotchbond 2 was placed as per manufacturer’s instructions. All treatment procedures, materials, and times were represented in all animals. Placement of silicate cement resulted in the most severe pulpal responses at all time periods. Stained bacterial profiles in the remaining dentin on the axial walls of inflamed control pulps were associated with severe pulpal inflammation. These results indicate that acid etching of vital dentin does not impair pulpal healing in deep Class V cavities

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