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Quintessence Publishing: Journals: QI
Quintessence International

Edited by Eli Eliav

ISSN 0033-6572 (print) • ISSN 1936-7163 (online)

Publication:
October 2004
Volume 35 , Issue 9

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Clinical evaluation of a resin composite and bonding agent in Class I and II restorations: 2-year results

Sven-┼ke Lundin, DDS/Carl G. Rasmusson, DMD

Pages: 758-762
PMID: 15471000

Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance and longevity of Tetric Ceram and Syntac Sprint restorations in stress-bearing areas performed in general practice. Method and materials: The light-curing resin composite Tetric Ceram in combination with the bonding material Syntac Sprint were used as restorative materials in three public dental health clinics. All the restorations were done by general practitioners in an ordinary patient pool attending a public health clinic. Before starting, the general practitioners were instructed and trained in performing the restorations according to a standardized clinical procedure, and the evaluations were done according to United States Public Health Service criteria. One hundred forty-eight restorations (27 Class I, 121 Class II) were done in 123 patients. After 2 years, 140 restorations (95%) could be assessed. Color slides and bitewings were taken to supplement the clinical evaluations of color match, marginal discoloration, secondary caries, and marginal adaptation. Wear of the restorations was evaluated according to the Leinfelder method. Results: After 2 years, 7 out of 148 restorations had failed, giving a failure rate of 5% of the tested materials. Five restorations failed due to hypersensitivity, one to secondary caries, and one to fracture. The wear rate was low (mean 37 Ám) and did not result in any replacement. Conclusion: This 2-year study showed that clinically satisfactory results could be obtained using resin composite Class I and II restorations in stress-bearing areas done in general practice on an ordinary clientele when the clinical procedure is standardized.

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