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Quintessence Publishing: Journals: QI
Quintessence International

Edited by Eli Eliav

ISSN 0033-6572 (print) • ISSN 1936-7163 (online)

Publication:
October 2005
Volume 36 , Issue 9

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The effect of different desensitizing agents on initial demineralization of human root dentin

Christian Ralf Gernhardt, Dr Med Dent, DDS/Kristin Aschenbach, DDS/Katrin Bekes, Dr Med Dent, DDS/Hans-Guenter Schaller, Dr Med Dent, DDS, PhD

Pages: 679685
PMID: 16163870

Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the caries-protective effect of 3 different desensitizing agents (Seal & Protect 2.0, D/Sense 2, and Gluma Desensitizer) on root dentin in vitro. Method and materials: The root surfaces of 60 freshly extracted, caries-free human molars were used. After removing the cementum, the teeth were coated with an acid-resistant nail varnish, exposing 2 rectangular windows of 2 X 3 mm each on the root surface. One window served as an untreated control, and the other window was treated with 1 of the desensitizing agents. The specimens were randomly distributed among the following experimental groups: group A, D/Sense 2; group B, Seal & Protect 2.0; and group C, Gluma Desensitizer. Subsequently, all specimens were demineralized for 14 days with acidified gel (HEC, pH 4.8, 37C). Two dentinal slabs were cut from each window. The slabs were ground to a thickness of 80 m and immersed in water. The demineralization depth was determined using a polarized light microscope. Results: The nontreated control specimens showed lesions with a mean depth of 84.9 m ( 6.0). In the specimens treated with the desensitizing agents, lesion depth was generally significantly reduced. Statistical analysis revealed significantly lower values for the specimens in group B in comparison with the others. Conclusion: Within the limitations of an in vitro investigation, it can be concluded that the demineralization of the root surface can be hampered by applying the desensitizing agents tested. (Quintessence Int 2005;36:679685)

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