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Volume 33 , Issue 1
January/February 2013

Pages e1–e8


In Vitro Color Changes of Soft Tissues Caused by Dyed Fluorescent Zirconia and Nondyed, Nonfluorescent Zirconia in Thin Mucosa


Arndt Happe, Dr Med Dent, DDS/Verena Schulte-Mattler, DMD/Christian Strassert, Dr Rer Nat/Michael Naumann, Prof Dr Med Dent, DMD/Michael Stimmelmayr, Dr Med Dent, DDS/Joachim E. Zöller, Prof Dr Med, Dr Med Dent, MD, DDS/Daniel Rothamel, Priv Doz (PhD), Dr Med, Dr Med Dent, MD, DDS


DOI: 10.11607/prd.1303

Abutment material selection may have an effect on the color of the peri-implant soft tissue, especially in thin mucosa. The objective of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of titanium, zirconia, and dyed fluorescent zirconia on the color of 1.5-mm-thick mucosa. Ten pig maxillae were used to simulate thin mucosa according to a previously published setup. Three different abutment materials were placed under the mucosa, and the color of the soft tissue was evaluated using a spectrophotometer. The test area without underlying material was used as a control. Whereas titanium induced visible color change values of ∆E7.3, significantly above the threshold level of ∆E3.7 (P < .05, Student t test), the changes after insertion of zirconia (∆E3.7) and dyed fluorescent zirconia (3.5) were not statistically different from the visible threshold of ∆E3.7 (P < .05, Student t test). The difference between the two zirconia specimens was not statistically significant, although the dyed zirconia material was darker; the color difference was ∆E10.35 between the two. In contrast to titanium, neither nondyed zirconia nor dyed fluorescent zirconia changed the gingival coloration. Moreover, shading of white zirconia with a fluorescent dye leads to an all-ceramic abutment material that mimics the optical properties of natural teeth. (Int J Periodontics Restorative Dent 2013;33:e1–e8. doi: 10.11607/prd.1303)


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