LOGIN
 
Share Page:
Back

Volume 11 , Issue 2
March/April 1996

Pages 210-215


Resistance to Bacterial Aggression Involving Exposed Nonresorbable Membranes in the Oral Cavity

Giulio Cesare Leghissa, Dr Med Dent/Annibale Renzo Botticelli, Prof Dr Med


PMID: 8666453

Bacterial colonies split implanted membranes that are exposed to oral biologic fluids as a consequence of dehiscence. The clinical and histologic behavior of 14 implanted polyurethane membranes was observed during the period of exposure to oral fluids for 2, 3, 4, and 6 weeks and without dehiscence (after 8 weeks). Statistical analysis indicated that the decrease in the number of neutrophils after 5 weeks, associated with the increase in the number of activated fibroblasts, cellular debris, giant cells, and aggression of bacteria, was statistically significant (from P < .05 and P < .01 for activated fibroblasts to P <.005 and P < .001 for neutrophilic cells). The increase in bacterial passage through the polyurethane membranes and in the number of giant cells and cellular debris after 8 weeks represents late dissolution of the membranes; the progressive increase of activated fibroblasts is significant because the longer the membrane resists, the better the cells can grow and give way to the process of tissue regeneration. (INT J ORAL MAXILLOFAC IMPLANTS 1996;11;210-215)

Key words: nonresorbable membranes, oral microbiology, oral pathology


Full Text PDF File | Order Article

 

 
Get Adobe Reader
Adobe Acrobat Reader is required to view PDF files. This is a free program available from the Adobe web site.
Follow the download directions on the Adobe web site to get your copy of Adobe Acrobat Reader.

 

© 2014 Quintessence Publishing Co, Inc JOMI Home
Current Issue
Ahead of Print
Archive
Author Guidelines
About
Accepted Manuscripts
Submission Form
Submit
Reprints
Permission
Advertising
Quintessence Home
Terms of Use
Privacy Policy
About Us
Contact Us
Help