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Volume 22 , Issue 6
November/December 2007

Pages 886892


Primary Stability of Turned and Acid-Etched Screw-Type Implants: A Removal Torque and Histomorphometric Study in Rabbits

Eduardo de Lima Fernandes, DDS, MSc/Ieda Levenzon Unikowski, DDS, MS/Eduardo Rolim Teixeira, DDS, PhD/Nilza Pereira da Costa, DDS, MSc, PhD/Rosemary Sadami Shinkai, DDS, MSc, PhD


PMID: 18271369

Purpose: This study evaluated the effect of primary stability on the osseointegration of turned and acid-etched screw implants in a rabbit model. Materials and Methods: One pair of turned and acid-etched implants (3.75 in diameter, 5.5 mm long) was placed in each tibia of 15 rabbits. In the right tibial metaphysis the implants were inserted according to a standard surgical protocol. In the left tibia, the osteotomy sites were enlarged using a sequence of drills, and 2 implants were placed with reduction of primary stability. Animals were sacrificed 9 weeks after surgery. Histomorphometric and removal torque analyses were performed to evaluate bone-implant contact and strength of osseointegration. Results: Surface texture had a significant effect on percentage of bone-implant contact (P = .001). Acid-etched implants with high primary stability showed the highest percentage of bone-implant contact (77%), followed by acid-etched implants with low primary stability (61%), turned implants with low primary stability (56%), and turned implants with high primary stability (46%). For removal torque, acid-etched implants had higher peak mean values than turned implant groups (P < .001). Reduction of primary stability was not significant to either percentage of bone-implant contact (P = .645) or removal torque values (P = .214). Conclusion: Acid-etched implants had higher bone response and implant fixation than turned implants, regardless of primary stability. Int J Oral Maxillofac Implants 2007;22:886892

Key words: dental implant, osseointegration, primary stability, surface treatment


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