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Volume 20 , Issue 6
November/December 2005

Pages 882–890


Image-Based Extracorporeal Tissue Engineering of Individualized Bone Constructs

Ulrich Meyer, MD, DDS, PhD/Andre Büchter, DDS/Ariane Hohoff, DDS/Elke Stoffels, PhD / Thomas Szuwart, PhD (Biol)/Christoph Runte, DDS, PhD/Dieter Dirksen, PhD (Phys) / Hans-Peter Wiesmann, PhD (Phys)


PMID: 16392345

Purpose: Computer-aided technologies have been recently employed for use in extracorporeal bone tissue engineering strategies. In this pilot animal experimental study, the intention was to test whether autologous osteoblast-like cells cultured in vitro on individualized scaffolds can be used to support bone regeneration in a clinical environment. Materials and Methods: For this purpose, mandibular bone defects were surgically introduced into the mandibles of minipigs and the scaffold of the defect site was modeled by computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing technique. Autologous bone cells from porcine calvaria were harvested from minipigs and grown in culture. Cells were seeded on scaffolds generated by rapid prototyping of polylactic acid/polyglycolic acid copolymers. The defects were then reconstructed by implanting the tissue constructs. Results: The intraoperative sites as well as the postoperative computerized tomographic scans demonstrated an accurate fit in the defect sites. The implanted scaffold constructs enriched with osteoblast-like cells were well tolerated and appeared to support bone formation, as revealed by histologic and immunohistochemical analyses. Discussion: These results indicated that in vitro expanded osteoblast-like cells spread on a resorbable individualized scaffold can be capable of promoting the repair of bony defects in vivo. Conclusion: These results warrant further attempts to combine computer modeling and tissue engineering for use in bone reconstructive surgery. Int J Oral Maxillofac Implants 2005;20:882–890
Key words: animal model, bioengineering, bone, osteoblasts


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