LOGIN
 
Share Page:
Back

Volume 29 , Issue 4
July/August 2014

Pages 836845


Accuracy of Implant Impressions for Partially and Completely Edentulous Patients: A Systematic Review

Panos Papaspyridakos, DDS, MS/Chun-Jung Chen, DDS, MS/German O. Gallucci, DMD, Dr Med Dent, PhD/Asterios Doukoudakis, DDS, MS, PhD/Hans-Peter Weber, DMD, Dr Med Dent/Vasilios Chronopoulos, DDS, MS, PhD


PMID: 25032763
DOI: 10.11607/jomi.3625

Purpose: To compare the accuracy of digital and conventional impression techniques for partially and completely edentulous patients and to determine the effect of different variables on the accuracy outcomes. Materials and Methods: An electronic and manual search was conducted to identify studies reporting on the accuracy of implant impressions. Pooled data were descriptively analyzed. Factors affecting the accuracy were identified, and their impact on accuracy outcomes was assessed. Results: The 76 studies that fulfilled the inclusion criteria featured 4 clinical studies and 72 in vitro studies. Studies were grouped according to edentulism; 41 reported on completely edentulous and 35 on partially edentulous patients. For completely edentulous patients, most in vitro studies and all three clinical studies demonstrated better accuracy with the splinted vs the nonsplinted technique (15 studies, splint; 1, nonsplint; 9, no difference). One clinical study and half of the in vitro studies reported better accuracy with the open-tray vs the closed-tray technique (10 studies, open-tray; 1, closed-tray; 10, no difference). For partially edentulous patients, one clinical study and most in vitro studies showed better accuracy with the splinted vs the nonsplinted technique (8 studies, splint; 2, nonsplint; 3, no difference). The majority of in vitro studies showed better accuracy with the open-tray vs the closed-tray technique (10 studies, open-tray; 1, closed-tray; 7, no difference), but the only clinical study reported no difference. Conclusion: The splinted impression technique is more accurate for both partially and completely edentulous patients. The open-tray technique is more accurate than the closed-tray for completely edentulous patients, but for partially edentulous patients there seems to be no difference. The impression material (polyether or polyvinylsiloxane) has no effect on the accuracy. The implant angulation affects the accuracy of implant impressions, while there are insufficient studies for the effect of implant connection type. Further accuracy studies are needed regarding digital implant impressions.


Full Text PDF File | Order Article

 

 
Get Adobe Reader
Adobe Acrobat Reader is required to view PDF files. This is a free program available from the Adobe web site.
Follow the download directions on the Adobe web site to get your copy of Adobe Acrobat Reader.

 

© 2017 Quintessence Publishing Co, Inc JOMI Home
Current Issue
Ahead of Print
Archive
Author Guidelines
About
Accepted Manuscripts
Submission Form
Submit
Reprints
Permission
Advertising
Quintessence Home
Terms of Use
Privacy Policy
About Us
Contact Us
Help