LOGIN
 
Share Page:
Back

Volume 14 , Issue 6
November/December 1999

Pages 835840


Bone Reactions to Anorganic Bovine Bone (Bio-Oss) Used in Sinus Augmentation Procedures: A Histologic Long-Term Report of 20 Cases in Humans

Maurizio Piattelli, MD, DDS, Gian Antonio Favero, MD, DDS, Antonio Scarano, DDS, Giovanna Orsini, DDS, Adriano Piattelli, MD, DDS


PMID: 10612920

Many materials are used for sinus augmentation procedures. Anorganic bovine bone (Bio-Oss) has been reported to be osteoconductive, and no inflammatory responses have been observed with the use of this biomaterial. One of the main questions pertaining to Bio-Oss concerns its biodegradation and substitution by host bone. Some investigators have observed rapid replacement by host bone, while other researchers observed slow resorptive activity or no resorption at all. The aim of the present study was to conduct a long-term histologic analysis of retrieved specimens in humans where Bio-Oss was used in sinus augmentation procedures. Specimens were retrieved from 20 patients after varying periods from 6 months to 4 years and were processed to obtain thin ground sections. Bio-Oss particles were surrounded for the most part by mature, compact bone. In some Haversian canals it was possible to observe small capillaries, mesenchymal cells, and osteoblasts in conjunction with new bone. No gaps were present at the interface between the Bio-Oss particles and newly formed bone. In specimens retrieved after 18 months and 4 years, it was also possible to observe the presence of osteoclasts in the process of resorbing the Bio-Oss particles and neighboring newly formed bone. Bio-Oss appears to be highly biocompatible and osteoconductive, is slowly resorbed in humans, and can be used with success as a bone substitute in maxillary sinus augmentation procedures. (Int J Oral Maxillofac Implants 1999;14:835840) Key words: anorganic bovine bone, biomaterials, sinus augmentation


Full Text PDF File | Order Article

 

 
Get Adobe Reader
Adobe Acrobat Reader is required to view PDF files. This is a free program available from the Adobe web site.
Follow the download directions on the Adobe web site to get your copy of Adobe Acrobat Reader.

 

© 2014 Quintessence Publishing Co, Inc JOMI Home
Current Issue
Ahead of Print
Archive
Author Guidelines
About
Accepted Manuscripts
Submission Form
Submit
Reprints
Permission
Advertising
Quintessence Home
Terms of Use
Privacy Policy
About Us
Contact Us
Help