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Volume 28 , Issue 5
September/October 2013

Pages 1331–1337


Retrospective Multicenter Study of 230 6-mm SLA-Surfaced Implants with 1- to 6-Year Follow-Up

Daniel Rodrigo, DDS, MSc/Gustavo Cabello, DDS, MSc/Mariano Herrero, DDS MD, MSc/David Gonzalez, DDS, MSc/Federico Herrero, DDS, MD, MSc/Luis Aracil, DDS, MD, PhD/Sergio Morante, DDS, MSc, PhD/Helena Rebelo, DDS, MD, MSc/Gabriel Villaverde, DDS, MSc/Andrés García, DDS, MSc/Ángel Alonso, DDS, MD, MSc, PhD/Manuel Barrachina, DDS, MD/Juan Blanco, DDS, MD, MSc, PhD/Ricardo Faría Almeida, DDS, MSc, PhD


PMID: 24066325
DOI: 10.11607/jomi.3129

Purpose: Using short implants poses a challenge in implant surgery. Implant surfaces have evolved, making it possible to improve the success of short implants substantially. However, there is still little information about the long-term predictability achieved with short, rough-surfaced implants. The objective of this study was to evaluate the long-term survival rate of 6-mm rough implants. Materials and Methods: A retrospective multicenter analysis of the survival of short 6-mm SLA-surfaced implants was conducted. A total of 230 implants placed in 159 patients were included. The follow-up time ranged between 1 and 6 years. Results: Seven of the 230 implants failed, which gives a cumulative survival rate of 96.4%. Two hundred and fourteen implants were placed in the mandible (93.1%), as opposed to 16 placed in the maxilla (6.9%). Five implants failed during the osseointegration period, and two failed after receiving the prosthetic load. No statistically significant differences were found (P < .44). Of the loaded implants, 209 were splinted to other implants, as opposed to 14 that were not. One implant failed in each group, resulting in a 99.5% for the splinted implants and 92.9% for the unsplinted implants. No statistically significant differences were found between the splinted and unsplinted groups (P < .12). Conclusions: The short implants used in this study displayed high longterm predictability when placed in the mandible and splinted. There is insufficient- information to extrapolate these results to the maxilla and non-splinted implants.


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