LOGIN
 
Share Page:
Back

Volume 27 , Issue 6
November/December 2012


Biomechanical Comparison of a Single Short and Wide Implant with Monocortical or Bicortical Engagement in the Atrophic Posterior Maxilla and a Long Implant in the Augmented Sinus


Shih-Hao Chang, DDS, MS/Chun-Li Lin, PhD/Yang-Sung Lin, MS/ Shue-Sang Hsue, PhD/Shiang-Rung Huang, MS


PMID: 23189315

Purpose: The present study investigated the biomechanical interactions of a monocortically or bicortically engaged short and wide implant in the atrophic posterior maxilla and compared them to those of a long implant in the augmented sinus under different loading conditions via a nonlinear finite element (FE) approach. Materials and Methods: Nonlinear FE models of a single implant in the posterior maxilla were constructed for the following conditions: (1) A monocortically engaged 5-mm-long, 7-mm-wide implant with an internal tripodgrip abutment connection (SIT-1), (2) a bicortically engaged 6-mm-long, 7-mm-wide implant with internal tripod-grip abutment connection (SIT-2), and (3) a 13-mm-long, 4.5-mm-wide implant with an internal-hexagon abutment connection in an augmented sinus. Simulated loads of 150 N were applied axially at the central fossa, off-axis at the buccal and palatal cusps, and toward the axis at the buccal and palatal cusps. Results: The simulated results showed that loading condition was the main factor influencing the mechanical responses. Oblique occlusal forces increased implant stress and stress/strain values for the surrounding bone. The use of a long implant decreased the implant stress but increased the bone stress/strain values relative to a short and wide implant. The SIT-1 and SIT-2 implants increased the implant stress on average by 2.94 and 2.67 fold, respectively. However, the SIT-2 implant reduced the average stress and strain in bone by 37%, and the SIT-1 implant reduced average stress by 33% and average strain by 32%. Conclusions: Placement of a short and wide implant in the atrophic posterior maxilla may be a possible alternative for reducing the strain/stress on the surrounding bone. Detrimental off-axis loads should always be minimized to prevent extraordinarily high bone strain and stress. Int J Oral Maxillofac Implants 2012;27:e102e111


Full Text PDF File | Order Article

 

 
Get Adobe Reader
Adobe Acrobat Reader is required to view PDF files. This is a free program available from the Adobe web site.
Follow the download directions on the Adobe web site to get your copy of Adobe Acrobat Reader.

 

© 2017 Quintessence Publishing Co, Inc JOMI Home
Current Issue
Ahead of Print
Archive
Author Guidelines
About
Accepted Manuscripts
Submission Form
Submit
Reprints
Permission
Advertising
Quintessence Home
Terms of Use
Privacy Policy
About Us
Contact Us
Help