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Oral Health & Preventive Dentistry

Edited by Prof. Dr. Jean-François Roulet, Prof. Dr. Dr. Niklaus P. Lang, Prof. Dr. Palle Holmstrup

Official journal of the Academy of Minimally Invasive Dentistry, the World Congress of Microdentistry, and the European Society of Preventive Dentistry

ISSN (print) 1602-1622 • ISSN (online) 1757-9996

Publication:

Winter 2005
Volume 3 , Issue 4



Pages: 237-241
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The Effect of Different Methods of Drinking a Carbonated Beverage on the Ph of Dental Plaque: An In Vivo Study

Aswini, Y. B. / Tangade, Pradeep S. / Ankola, Anil V. / Nagesh, L. / Pradnya, Hedge

Purpose: Fizzy drinks are known to be erosive or cariogenic, but little is known about the ways of reducing their harmfulness by altering the method of drinking. The purpose of this study was to assess the changes in plaque pH, at different time intervals in vivo after consuming a carbonated beverage (sprite, pH = 2.98) with plastic glass, straw and directly from bottle. Design: A clinical study. Material and Methods: Eighteen subjects aged 1825 years were recruited for the study and were divided randomly into three groups, six in each (group A- plastic glass, B- straw and C- directly from bottle) after the salivary pH was measured. Subjects were requested to refrain from brushing for 24 hours prior to the study. Collection of pooled plaque was done before and after consuming the drink at five, 10-, 20- and 30-minute intervals. Plaque pH was assessed by glass combination electrode. ANOVA and post hoc Tukey’s test was used for statistical analysis. Results: Highest mean pH drop (5.29) was recorded when consumed with plastic glass at all time intervals. There was a significant difference between group A and B at 5 min and 10 min (P < 0.05). However, no difference was seen between group B and C, A and C (P > 0.05). Conclusions: The use of a straw and direct consumption of beverage from the bottle could limit harmful effects on dentition.

Keywords: dental erosion, carbonated beverages, plaque, pH, cariogenic diet

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