LOGIN
 
Share Page:
Back

Volume 24 , Issue 2
Spring 2010

Pages 172180


Glutamate-induced Temporomandibular Joint Pain in Healthy Individuals Is Partially Mediated by Peripheral NMDA Receptors

Per Alstergren, DDS, PhD/Malin Ernberg, DDS, PhD/Mikael Nilsson, DDS, MSc/Anna-Kari Hajati, DDS, MSc/Barry J. Sessle, MDS, PhD, DSc(hc)/Sigvard Kopp, DDS, PhD


PMID: 20401355

Aim: To determine if glutamate injected into the healthy temporomandibular joint (TMJ) evokes pain through peripheral N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and if such pain is influenced by sex or sex steroid hormones. Methods: Sixteen healthy men and 36 healthy women were included and subjected to two randomized and double-blind intra-articular injections of the TMJ. Experimental TMJ pain was induced by injection of glutamate (1.0 mol/L) and NMDA block was achieved by co-injection of the NMDA antagonist ketamine (10 mmol/L). The TMJ pain intensity in the joint before and during a 25-minute postinjection period was continuously recorded on an electronic visual analog scale (0 to 10). Estradiol, progesterone, and testosterone levels in serum were analyzed. Results: Glutamate-induced pain showed a median (25/75 percentile) duration of 8.3 (5.2/12.2) minutes. The peak pain intensity was 6.1 (4.2/8.2), the time to peak was 50 (30/95) seconds, and the area under the curve was 59 (29/115) arbitrary units. The women reported higher maximum pain intensity than the men and shorter time to peak. The sex hormone levels were not significantly related to the glutamate-induced TMJ pain. NMDA block significantly reduced the glutamate-induced TMJ pain, mainly in the women. There were no significant correlations between sex hormone levels and the effects of NMDA block for any pain variable. Conclusion: Glutamate evokes immediate pain in the healthy human TMJ that is partly mediated by peripheral NMDA receptors in the TMJ. J Orofac Pain 2010;24:172180


Full Text PDF File | Order Article

 

 
Get Adobe Reader
Adobe Acrobat Reader is required to view PDF files. This is a free program available from the Adobe web site.
Follow the download directions on the Adobe web site to get your copy of Adobe Acrobat Reader.

 

© 2017 Quintessence Publishing Co, Inc

JOFPH Home
Current Issue
Ahead of Print
Archive
Author Guidelines
About
Accepted Manuscripts
Submission Form
Submit
Reprints
Permission
Advertising
Quintessence Home
Terms of Use
Privacy Policy
About Us
Contact Us
Help