LOGIN
 
Share Page:
Back

Volume 14 , Issue 2
Spring 2000

Pages 147-151


Trigeminal Neuralgia Due to an Acoustic Neuroma in the Cerebellopontine Angle

Yoshizo Matsuka, DDS, PhD/Edward T. Fort, DDS/Robert L. Merrill, DDS, MS


PMID: 11203749

This case report first reviews the intracranial tumors associated with symptoms of trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Among patients with TN-like symptoms, 6 to 16% are variously reported to have intracranial tumors. The most common cerebellopontine angle (CPA) tumor to cause TN-like symptoms is a benign tumor called an acoustic neuroma. The reported clinical symptoms of the acoustic neuroma are hearing deficits (60 to 97%), tinnitus (50 to 66%), vestibular disturbances (46 to 59%), numbness or tingling in the face (33%), headache (19 to 29%), dizziness (23%), facial paresis (17%), and trigeminal nerve disturbances (hypesthesia, paresthesia, and neuralgia) (12 to 45%). Magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium enhancement or computed tomography with contrast media are each reported to have excellent abilities to detect intracranial tumors (92 to 93%). This article then reports a rare case of a young female patient who was mistakenly diagnosed and treated for a temporomandibular disorder but was subsequently found to have an acoustic neuroma located in the CPA.


Full Text PDF File | Order Article

 

 
Get Adobe Reader
Adobe Acrobat Reader is required to view PDF files. This is a free program available from the Adobe web site.
Follow the download directions on the Adobe web site to get your copy of Adobe Acrobat Reader.

 

© 2017 Quintessence Publishing Co, Inc

JOFPH Home
Current Issue
Ahead of Print
Archive
Author Guidelines
About
Accepted Manuscripts
Submission Form
Submit
Reprints
Permission
Advertising
Quintessence Home
Terms of Use
Privacy Policy
About Us
Contact Us
Help