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Publication:
Journal of Oral Laser Applications

Year 2001
Volume 1 , Issue 2

Back
Pages: 97 - 101

Low-energy Laser Therapy in Oral Mucositis

César Migliorati/Celso Massumoto/Fernanda de Paula Eduardo/Karin Praia Muller/Teresa Carrieri/Patrícia Haypek/Carlos de Paula Eduardo

Purpose: The use of high-dose chemotherapy as part of the preparative regimen for stem cell transplantation is associated with mucosal damage. Laser irradiation of the oral mucosa may help to decrease the severity of mucositis. This pilot trial was conducted to evaluate the usefulness of low-energy laser therapy in the control of pain associated with oral mucositis after stem cell transplantation or high-dose chemotherapy. Materials and Methods: Eleven patients with the diagnosis of chronic myelogenous leukemia (n = 4), non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (n = 3), acute myelocytic leukemia (n = 1), and other malignancies (n = 3) were submitted to high-dose chemotherapy for myeloablation. Seven patients received autologous stem cell transplantation, two from allogeneic sources, and two were given high-dose chemotherapy only. The oral cavity of all patients was examined by an oral medicine specialist during the pretransplant and prechemotherapy workup. The patients received irradiation with the mucolaser daily until post-transplant day 5. The entire oral mucosa was treated with a final energy density of 2 J/cm2. Mucositis was clinically evaluated according to the WHO scale, and pain was measured by a visual analogue scale (VAS). Results: The laser treatment was well tolerated by the patients. Two patients had mucositis grade I-II, 8 patients had grade III-IV, and 1 patient had none. None of the patients had the maximal pain score. Six patients had grade 0-3 and 5 patients had grade 5-8 by VAS. The majority of patients associated the daily application of laser with prompt pain relief. Conclusion: The use of low-energy laser therapy may play a role in the control of pain associated with oral mucositis. In order to evaluate the efficacy of laser therapy in the prevention of mucositis after stem cell transplantation, a randomized controlled trial was initiated.

 

 
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