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Quintessence Publishing: Journals: JAD

 

The Journal of Adhesive Dentistry

Edited by Jean-François Roulet

ISSN (print) 1461-5185 • ISSN (online) 1757-9988

Publication:

January/February 2013
Volume 15 , Issue 1



Pages: 41 - 46
PMID: 23534001
DOI: 10.3290/j.jad.a28172
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Effects of Warm Air Drying on Water Sorption, Solubility, and Adhesive Strength of Simplified Etch-and-Rinse Adhesives

Reis, Alessandra / Wambier, Leticia / Malaquias, Tamirez / Wambier, Denise S. / Loguercio, Alessandro D.

Purpose: To evaluate the effects of the temperature of air used for solvent evaporation on water sorption, solubility, and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of simplified etch-and-rinse adhesives.
Materials and Methods: Four commercial simplified etch-and-rinse adhesives (Adper Single Bond 2 [SB]; Te Econom [TE]; XP Bond [XP] and Ambar [AM]) were selected. Disk-shaped specimens were prepared by dispensing the uncured resin into a mold (5.8 mm x 0.8 mm). Solvent evaporation was performed using a warm (60C) or cold (20C) air stream for 40 s. After desiccation, the cured specimens were weighed and then stored in distilled water for evaluation of the water diffusion kinetics over a 28-day period. For the UTS measurement, hourglass-shaped specimens of adhesives were prepared and tested in tension. The data from each test were evaluated with two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test at a confidence level of 95%.
Results: Water sorption and solubility varied significantly between materials, but no significant difference was observed between warm and cold conditions (p > 0.05). TE and AM showed the lowest water sorption and solubility (p < 0.05). For SB, TE, and XP, the use of a warm air stream resulted in higher ultimate tensile strength (p < 0.05) in both experimental conditions.
Conclusions: The water sorption and solubility of the materials seem to be more influenced by their composition than by the temperature used for solvent evaporation. For some adhesives, the use of a warm air stream can yield higher ultimate tensile strength.

Keywords: adhesives systems, water sorption, solubility, adhesive strength, warm air

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