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Quintessence Publishing: Journals: IJP
The International Journal of Prosthodontics

Edited by George A. Zarb, BChD, DDS, MS, MS, FRCD(C)

ISSN 0893-2174

Publication:
January/February 2003
Volume 16 , Issue 1

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Clinical Evaluation of Teeth Restored with Quartz Fiber-Reinforced Epoxy Resin Posts

Silvia Malferrari, DDS, Carlo Monaco, DDS, Roberto Scotti, MD, DDS

Pages: 39–44
PMID: 12675453

Purpose: This prospective clinical follow-up evaluated the acceptability of quartz fiber–reinforced epoxy posts used in endodontically treated teeth over a 30-month period. Materials and Methods: In 132 patients, 180 endodontically treated teeth were restored using Æstheti-Plus quartz-fiber posts. The posts were luted with the All-Bond 2 adhesive system and C&B Resin Cement according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. The core was made with Core-Flo or Bis-Core, and all-ceramic crowns or metalceramic crowns were applied as final restorations. The parameters considered as clinical failure were displacement, detachment, or fracture of posts; core or root fracture; and crown or prosthesis decementation. Patients were reevaluated at 6, 12, 24, and 30 months. Results: One cohesive failure involving a margin of the composite core was observed after 2 weeks, and two adhesive fractures were seen after 2 months. These failures were located between the cement and the dentin walls of the canals. All three failures occurred during removal of the temporary crown. The percentage of failures was thus 1.7% over a 30-month period, but it was possible to successfully replace the restoration in all three failed cases. Conclusion: Over a 30-month period, the rehabilitation of endodontically treated teeth using quartz-fiber posts showed good clinical results. No crown or prosthesis decementation was observed, and no post, core, or root fractures were recorded. Int J Prosthodont 2003;16:39–44.

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