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Volume 15 , Issue 5
September/October 2002

Pages 467–472


Fracture Resistance and Marginal Adaptation of Conventionally Cemented Fiber-Reinforced Composite Three-Unit FPDs

Michael Behr, DDS, PhDa, Martin Rosentritt, MSb, Elke Ledwinsky, DDSc, Gerhard Handel, DDS, PhDd


PMID: 12375462

Purpose: This in vitro study investigated the marginal adaptation and fracture resistance of three-unit fiber-reinforced composite fixed partial dentures (FPD) luted with two different resin-modified glass-ionomers. Materials and Methods: A total of 48 FPDs were constructed from the glass fiber–reinforced materials FibreKor/Sculpture, Vectris/Targis, or the polyethylene fiber system BelleGlass/Connect (n = 16 for each brand). The reconstructions were conventionally luted on human molars using resin-modified ProTecCEM or Fuji Plus and then exposed to thermocycling and mechanical loading. Results: During thermocycling and mechanical loading, cementation failed in seven of eight FibreKor or BelleGlass FPDs and in one of eight Vectris/Targis FPDs luted with ProTecCEM. All Fuji Plus–cemented FPDs showed no signs of damage or cementation loss. The fracture resistance of the remaining FPDs was as follows: Vectris/Targis–ProTecCem 1,361 ± 360 N, Vectis/Targis–Fuji Plus 923 ± 207 N, BelleGlass/Connect 940 ± 155 N, and FibreKor/Sculpture 524 ± 202 N. The marginal adaptation of the cement-tooth interface deteriorated by 13% to 21% for all reconstructions after stress application, which was not statistically significant. The crown-cement interface had a significantly greater marginal gap only with the combination of FibreKor and Fuji Plus after stress simulation (change 33%). Conclusion: Conventional cementation of fiber-reinforced FPDs can lead to cementation loss. The marginal adaptation and fracture resistance deteriorated in comparison to adhesively cemented reconstructions. Int J Prosthodont 2002;15:467–472.


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