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Volume 15 , Issue 4
July/August 2002

Pages 365370


In Vitro Push-out Strength of Seven Luting Agents to Dentin

Jean-Marie Cheylan, DDS, PhDa, Samuel Gonthier, DDSb, Michel Degrange, DDS, PhDc


PMID: 12170851

Purpose: New luting agents, described as resin-modified glass-ionomer cements and compomers, have been developed during the last decade to improve the retention of cemented restorations. The aims of this study were to (1) compare the push-out strength of these new luting materials against both conventional cements and bonding luting agents, and (2) evaluate the influence of dentin surface treatment on both glass-ionomer cement and 4-META adhesive resin push-out strength. Materials and Methods: Conical standardized cavities were drilled in the center of coronal dentin disks. Ninety sandblasted Ni-Cr inlays, divided into nine batches, were luted into the cavities according to the surface treatment and the nature of the following luting agents: zinc phosphate cement, zinc polycarboxylate cement, type I glass-ionomer +/- polyacrylic acid, resin-modified glass-ionomer, polyacid-modified composite resin, filled bis-GMA phosphate ester resin, and 4-META adhesive resin +/- application of activated monomer. Each specimen was placed in a holding device, and a steel rod was used to apply a force on the inlay until rupture occurred. The push-out strength was calculated, and the failure mode was controlled. Results: There were significant differences between some of the groups. The highest push-out strength was achieved by the 4-META adhesive resin after application of activated monomer. The lowest value was attained with zinc phosphate and polycarboxylate cements. Conclusion: Both resin-modified glass-ionomer and polyacid-modified composite resin luting materials exhibited a push-out strength similar to resin-based materials. Specific dentin surface treatments significantly enhanced the push-out strengths of glass-ionomer cement and 4-META adhesive resin. Int J Prosthodont 2002;15:365370.


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