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Volume 23 , Issue 1
January/February 2010

Pages 22–28


Implant Prosthodontic Rehabilitation of Patients with Rheumatic Disorders: A Case Series Report

Michael Weinländer, MD, DMD/Gerald Krennmair, MD, DMD, PhD/Eva Piehslinger, MD, DMD, PhD


PMID: 20234887

Purpose: This retrospective study assessed implant and prosthodontic treatment outcomes of patients suffering from rheumatic disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and connective tissue diseases (CTDs). Materials and Methods: This study included 22 patients (all women) suffering from autoimmune rheumatic disorders such as isolated RA (n = 16), RA with concomitant CTDs (n = 5), or isolated CTDs (n = 1). Overall, 89 implants were placed for rehabilitations such as single-tooth replacement (n = 8), fixed partial dentures (n = 14), complete dentures (n = 5), and overdentures (n = 2), and were evaluated after a mean of 42.6 ± 25.2 months. The cumulative implant survival and success rates and peri-implant conditions (marginal bone loss, pocket depth, Plaque Index, Gingival Index, Bleeding Index, and Calculus Index) were evaluated with a special focus on RA and CTDs. In addition, incidence and type of prosthodontic maintenance were evaluated. Results: A high implant survival rate was noted during follow-up with a cumulative 3-year implant success rate of 96.1%. Patients with RA demonstrated acceptable marginal bone resorption (mean: 2.1 ± 0.5 mm) and good soft tissue conditions, while CTD patients showed increased bone resorption (mean: 3.1 ± 0.7 mm). This was especially noted in scleroderma patients, as were major peri-implant soft tissue alterations (Bleeding Index) in patients suffering from Sjögren syndrome. Conclusions: A high implant and prothodontic success rate can be anticipated even for patients suffering from autoimmune rheumatic disorders such as RA and CTDs. A scrupulous maintenance program that includes optimal oral hygiene could assist in ensuring stable long-term results for CTD patients with more vulnerable soft tissue conditions. Int J Prosthodont 2010;23:22–28.


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