Home Subscription Services
 
   

 
The International Journal of Prosthodontics
IJP Home Page
About the Editor
Editorial Board
Accepted Manuscripts
Submit
Author Guidelines
Submission Form
Reprints / Articles
Permissions
Advertising
MEDLINE Search
 
 
 
 
 
FacebookTwitter
Quintessence Publishing: Journals: IJP
The International Journal of Prosthodontics

Edited by George A. Zarb, BChD, DDS, MS, MS, FRCD(C)

ISSN 0893-2174

Publication:
May/June 1998
Volume 11 , Issue 3

Back
Share Abstract:

Tolerance Test of Five Different Types of Crowns on Single-Tooth Implants

Erneklint/Odman/Ortengren/Rasmusson

Pages: 233-239
PMID: 9728117

Purpose: The main purpose of the present experimental study was to compare five different types of crowns, cemented on implant abutments, regarding their capability to withstand loads. Materials and Methods: Three types of all-ceramic crowns, a gold-foil-reinforced porcelain crown, and, as a control, a conventional metal ceramic crown were tested. Each crown was cemented onto an Astra Tech Single-Tooth implant. The five types of crowns, three of each type, and the titanium implants were subjected to loading in Lloyd test equipment until part of them was damaged, at which point the compression value was recorded and the deflection and bending moment were calculated. Comparisons were made on the basis of these data. Results: The results showed that the all-ceramic crowns fitted with a core should be able to withstand normally occurring biting forces without difficulty. The foil crown was also judged to be acceptable, while the bending moment of the cast all-ceramic crown without a core was considered unpredictable. The values for the metal ceramic design were as predicted, ie, they were clearly the highest in the study; the superior strength of metal ceramics should still be taken into account when deciding between all-ceramic colutions and the conventional metal ceramic crown. Conclusions: It was concluded that all-ceramic crowns are weak er than conventional metal ceramic crowns; however, based on estimated maximum clinical loadign (370 N in the incisor and premolar regions), In-Ceram and AllCeram crowns seem to function satisfactorily on implants.

Full Text PDF File | Order Article

 

 
Get Adobe Reader
Adobe Acrobat Reader is required to view PDF files. This is a free program available from the Adobe web site.
Follow the download directions on the Adobe web site to get your copy of Adobe Acrobat Reader.
  © 2014 Quintessence Publishing Co Inc
 

Home | Subscription Services | Books | Journals | Multimedia | Events | Blog
Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | About Us | Contact Us | Advertising | Help | Sitemap | Catalog