LOGIN
 
Share Page:
Back

Volume 22 , Issue 2
March/April 2009

Pages 127–135


Changes in Patient and FDP Profiles Following the Introduction of Osseointegrated Implant Dentistry in a Prosthodontic Practice

Terry R. Walton


PMID: 19418856

Purpose: This paper describes the effects of implant-related dentistry on patient profiles and the types of fixed dental prostheses provided in clinical practice. Materials and Methods: All implant- and tooth-supported prostheses provided in a prosthodontic practice between 1984 and 2007 were tabulated. Incidence was analyzed in relation to gender, age at time of prostheses insertion, and prostheses type. Results: Tooth-supported single crowns (TSCs) and tooth-supported fixed dental prostheses (TFDPs) were involved in 97% of treatments requiring fixed dental prostheses from 1984 to 1991. From 1991 to 2007, however, a marked increase in the number of implants restored directly corresponded with a decrease in the number of TFDPs so that by 2007, implant-supported fixed dental prostheses (IFDPs) accounted for 81% of all tooth replacements. Between 1984 and 2007 the incidence of TFDPs was 61% in females and 39% in males, whereas the incidence of IFDPs was 55% in females and 45% in males. IFDPs were also involved in 35% of restorations in patients under 31 years of age and TFDPs in 19%. In the under-21 years age group, IFDPs were more common in females (9%) than males (4%), but in the 21 to 30 years age group they were more common in males (21%) than females (13%). There was a decrease in three-unit TFDPs, in TFDPs with four or more pontics and those not satisfying Ante’s Law, and in teeth used that had been subjectively assessed to have an unfavorable 10-year prognosis at the time of prosthesis insertion. Conclusions: The incorporation of osseointegrated implant dentistry into a clinical practice has resulted in changes in the patient profile and type of fixed dental prostheses provided, including a decrease in the use of TFDPs; an increase in the referral of patients under 31 years of age; a decrease in three-unit, long-span, and complex TFDPs; and a decrease in tooth abutments assessed to be structurally or biologically compromised. Int J Prosthodont 2009;22:127–135


Full Text PDF File | Order Article

 

 
Get Adobe Reader
Adobe Acrobat Reader is required to view PDF files. This is a free program available from the Adobe web site.
Follow the download directions on the Adobe web site to get your copy of Adobe Acrobat Reader.

 

© 2017 Quintessence Publishing Co, Inc

IJP Home
Current Issue
Ahead of Print
Archive
Author Guidelines
About
Accepted Manuscripts
Submission Form
Submit
Reprints
Permission
Advertising
Quintessence Home
Terms of Use
Privacy Policy
About Us
Contact Us
Help