LOGIN
 
Share Page:
Back

Volume 20 , Issue 2
March/April 2007

Pages 193198


Finite Element Analysis of Stress-Breaking Attachments on Maxillary Implant-Retained Overdentures

Fuminori Tanino, DDS / Iwao Hayakawa, DDS, PhD / Shigezo Hirano, DDS, PhD / Shunsuke Minakuchi, DDS, PhD


PMID: 17455444

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of stress-breaking attachments at the connections between maxillary palateless overdentures and implants. Materials and Methods: Three-dimensional finite element models were used to reproduce an edentulous human maxilla with an implant-retained overdenture. Two-implant models (in the canine tooth positions on both sides) and four-implant models (in the canine and second premolar tooth positions on both sides) were examined. Stress-breaking material connecting the implants and denture was included around each abutment. Axial loads of 100 N were applied to the occlusal surface at the left first molar tooth positions. In each model, the influence of the stress-breaking attachments was compared by changing the elastic modulus from 1 to 3,000 MPa and the thickness of the stress-breaking material from 1 to 3 mm. Maximum stress at the implant-bone interface and stress at the cortical bone surface just under the loading point were calculated. Results: In all models, maximum stress at the implant-bone interface with implants located in the canine tooth position was generated at the peri-implant bone on the loading side. As the elastic modulus of the stress-breaking materials increased, the stress increased at the implant-bone interface and decreased at the cortical bone surface. Moreover, stress at the implant-bone interface with 3-mm-thick stress-breaking material was smaller than that with 1-mm-thick material. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this experiment, stress generated at the implant-bone interface could be controlled by altering the elastic modulus and thickness of the stress-breaking materials. Int J Prosthodont 2007;20:193198


Full Text PDF File | Order Article

 

 
Get Adobe Reader
Adobe Acrobat Reader is required to view PDF files. This is a free program available from the Adobe web site.
Follow the download directions on the Adobe web site to get your copy of Adobe Acrobat Reader.

 

© 2017 Quintessence Publishing Co, Inc

IJP Home
Current Issue
Ahead of Print
Archive
Author Guidelines
About
Accepted Manuscripts
Submission Form
Submit
Reprints
Permission
Advertising
Quintessence Home
Terms of Use
Privacy Policy
About Us
Contact Us
Help