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Volume 14 , Issue 1
January/February 2001

Pages 6570


Severity, Distribution, and Correlates of Occlusal Tooth Wear in a Sample of Mexican-American and European-American Adults

Mark A. Pigno, DDS, John P. Hatch, PhD, Renata C. M. Rodrigues-Garcia, DDS, MS, Shiro Sakai, DDS, MS, John D. Rugh, PhD


PMID: 11842908

Purpose: The objective of this study was to determine the severity, distribution, and correlates of tooth wear in a sample of Mexican-American and European-American adults drawn from a community-based longitudinal aging study on oral health. Materials and Methods: The maxillary teeth of 71 subjects enrolled in a longitudinal aging study were assessed using a previously introduced five-point (0 to 4) ordinal scoring system in which each tooth is given a score describing the severity of wear. The tooth wear scores were compared with data concerning demographic factors, functional/parafunctional habits, soft drink consumption, and bite force measurements to determine specific correlates of tooth wear. Results: The mean wear score for all teeth was 1.50 on the five-point scale. There was a significant difference between the mean wear score of anterior teeth (1.85) and posterior teeth (1.17). Bivariate analyses detected a moderate degree of correlation between maxillary tooth wear and age and bite force. Maxillary tooth wear was significantly greater in males and in subjects with reported teeth clenching/grinding. Multivariate analyses revealed that age, gender, bite force, self-reported teeth clenching/grinding, and number of daily meals/snacks had significant correlations with maxillary tooth wear. Conclusion: The overall severity of maxillary tooth wear in this sample of Mexican-American and European-American adults was low, with anterior teeth having a greater degree of wear than posterior teeth. Age, gender, bite force, teeth clenching/grinding, and number of daily meals/snacks are potential factors that may have contributed to tooth wear in the study sample. Int J Prosthodont 2001;14:6570.


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