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Volume 19 , Issue 5
September/October 2006

Pages 482–490


Pilot Study on the Psychologic Evaluation of Prosthesis Incompatibility Using the SCL-90-R Scale and the CES-D Scale

Stephan Eitner, PhD, DMD, Dr Med Dent / Manfred Wichmann, PhD, DMD, Dr Med Dent / Josef Heckmann, MD, PhD, Dr Med Dent / Stefan Holst, DMD, Dr Med Dent


PMID: 17323727

Purpose: The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate and determine psychogenic aspects of prosthesis incompatibility by psychologic tests that define the (psychogenic) prosthesis incompatibility as a psychologic disorder. The patients’ complaints with the restorations included taste disorders, odynophagia, pain sensations, and functional and esthetic dissatisfaction. Materials and Methods: The study cohort comprised 83 patients with complete dentures fabricated according to a standardized protocol. A dental history questionnaire was used to evaluate whether the patients had adapted to their dentures 6 months after incorporation. Twelve patients with suspected psychogenic prosthesis incompatibility and a group of 24 randomly selected control subjects were evaluated by application of the psychologic tests Symptom Checklist–90-R (SCL-90-R) and the Center of Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Results: When compared with the control group, patients with suspected psychogenic dental prosthesis incompatibility showed statistically significant differences in the CES-D cumulative values (P = .015) and the SCL-90-R values Global Severity Index (P = .024) and Positive Symptom Distress Index (P = .049). Conclusion: This was the first documented study to use the SCL-90-R and CES-D scales on patients with suspected psychogenic dental prosthesis incompatibility with nonadaptation 6 months after incorporation. Adaptation problems were ruled out as a possible cause. Using the SCL-90-R and CES-D, it was possible to make a reliable initial diagnosis of the psychosomatic clinical situation regarding psychogenic prosthesis incompatibility. The results have direct implications on socioeconomic and forensic consequences for diagnosis and treatment by a dental clinician. Int J Prosthodont 2006;19:482–490.


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