LOGIN
 
Share Page:
Back

Volume 19 , Issue 5
September/October 2006

Pages 449454


General Well-Being as an Important Co-factor of Self-Assessment of Dental Appearance

Stefan Wolfart, DDS, Dr Med Dent / Anne Catrin Quaas, DDS, Dr Med Dent / Sandra Freitag, Dr Rer Nat / Peter Kropp, Dr Rer Nat, PhD / Wolf-Dieter Gerber, Dr Rer Nat, PhD / Matthias Kern, DDS, Dr Med Dent, PhD


PMID: 17323722

Purpose: This study aimed to correlate the general well-being of patients and their judgment about their dental appearance. Materials and Methods: Based on internationally accepted guidelines regarding dental esthetics, a questionnaire was developed to measure subjective assessments of dental appearance. Fourteen items defined an esthetic sum score (0 = satisfied; 56 = dissatisfied). Further, general well-being was evaluated with a long-established and highly reliable test. Eighty participants were included (47 women, 33 men). Participants were drawn from 4 different groups (n = 20): natural dentition (group N), fixed partial dentures (group F), removable partial dentures (group R), and patients who had an esthetic problem with their teeth (group P). Results: Seventy-five participants showed a normal well-being. Five participants showed a depressive state and formed a new group (group D). The medians of the sum scores (25th, 75th percentile) were: group N: 12 (10, 14); group F: 14 (8, 29); group R: 14 (9, 27); group P: 23 (18, 35); group D: 30 (26, 35). Significant differences were found between groups N and P, as well as between group D and groups N, F, and R. Conclusion: Because of the significant difference between groups N and P, basis validation of the sum score was achieved. Further, self-assessments of dental appearance appeared to be more negative for participants with a depressive state compared with the other groups. In clinical studies, selection bias can be prevented by using a test that measures well-being to verify if a study sample includes a normal number of depressive subjects and therefore represents the general population. Int J Prosthodont 2006;19:449454.


Full Text PDF File | Order Article

 

 
Get Adobe Reader
Adobe Acrobat Reader is required to view PDF files. This is a free program available from the Adobe web site.
Follow the download directions on the Adobe web site to get your copy of Adobe Acrobat Reader.

 

© 2017 Quintessence Publishing Co, Inc

IJP Home
Current Issue
Ahead of Print
Archive
Author Guidelines
About
Accepted Manuscripts
Submission Form
Submit
Reprints
Permission
Advertising
Quintessence Home
Terms of Use
Privacy Policy
About Us
Contact Us
Help