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Volume 27 , Issue 4
July/August 2014

Pages 311–319


Phase 1 Clinical Trial on the Effect of Palatal Brushing on Denture Stomatitis

Marla Kabawat, DDS, MSc/Raphael F. de Souza, DDS, PhD/Maurício M. Badaró, DDS, MSc/Louis de Koninck, DMD, MSc, FRCD(c)/Jean Barbeau, BSc, MSc, PhD/Pierre Rompré, MSc/Elham Emami, DDS, MSc, PhD


PMID: 25010873
DOI: 10.11607/ijp.3844

Purpose: This study aimed to assess the efficacy of palatal brushing in the treatment of denture stomatitis. Materials and Methods: After screening 143 individuals with a potential diagnosis of denture stomatitis, 48 patients (mean age: 66.0 ± 11.2 years) were enrolled in a two-center phase 1 clinical trial with a one-group pretest/posttest design. The intervention of interest was manual palatal brushing after each meal and before bedtime. Clinical and microbiologic examinations were performed at baseline and 1 and 3 months after treatment. Additional data were obtained using a validated questionnaire. The primary and secondary outcomes were the remission of denture stomatitis and diminution of Candida colony-forming units (CFUs), respectively. Descriptive and nonparametric statistical tests were conducted to analyze the data. Results: At the 3-month follow-up, denture stomatitis was completely cured in 10.4% of the participants, and 70.8% of denture wearers showed improvement in the clinical signs of denture stomatitis. There was a significant reduction in the area and severity of the palatal inflammation (P < .0001). The effect size ranged from medium to large (0.34 to 0.54) depending on the classification used for the diagnosis of denture stomatitis. A significant reduction in the number of Candida CFUs isolated from the palatal mucosa and dentures (P ≤ .05) was observed. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that palatal brushing is an effective treatment of denture stomatitis. Int J Prosthodont 2014;27:311–319. doi: 10.11607/ijp.3844


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