LOGIN
 
Share Page:
Back

Volume 25 , Issue 2
March/April 2012

Pages 138144


Clinical Performance of Cast Clasp-Retained Removable Partial Dentures: A Retrospective Study

Michael Behr, DDS, PhD/Florian Zeman, Math D/Torsten Passauer, DDS/Michael Koller, MS, PhD/Sebastian Hahnel, DDS, PhD/Ralf Buergers, DDS, PhD/Reinhold Lang, DDS/Gerhard Handel, DDS, PhD/Carola Kolbeck, DDS, PhD


PMID: 22371834

Purpose: This retrospective study investigated the survival rate of 174 clasp-retained removable partial dentures (CR-RPDs) made at the Department of Prosthodontics of the Regensburg University Medical Center over a 25-year period (1984 to 2009). Materials and Methods: The study analyzed the frequency of and time to the fracture of clasps, connectors, or denture bases; the occurrence of caries or periodontal lesions; the loss of abutment teeth; and the necessity of maintenance procedures such as relining or treatment of pressure areas. Results: The median follow-up time of 3 years was calculated using the inverse Kaplan-Meier method. The 5-year survival rate (time to renewal) of all CR-RPDs was 96.4%; the 10-year survival rate was 89.8%. Fractures most frequently occurred in clasps (n = 28, 16.1%) followed by major connectors (n = 9, 5.1%) and minor connectors (n = 6, 3.4%). The 5-year event-free rate for clasp fracture was 80.4%; the 10-year event-free rate was 76.9%. Caries lesions on abutment teeth were seen in 31.6% of patients, and 35.6% showed inflammation of the periodontal tissue surrounding the abutment teeth. The 5-year event-free rate for caries was 58.4%; the 10-year rate was 39.6%. A frequent complication was loss of abutment teeth (n = 15), but this complication was not age-dependent. After insertion of their prostheses, one-third of patients (n = 53, 30.5%) showed pressure areas of the mucosa. Significantly more (P < .001) pressure areas were caused by prostheses of the mandible (39.6%) than by those of the maxilla (12.5%). Conclusions: CR-RPDs showed a survival rate of approximately 90% after 10 years of oral service. The predominant complications during oral service were caries lesions, loss of abutment teeth, and fracture of clasps. Int J Prosthodont 2012;25:138144.


Full Text PDF File | Order Article

 

 
Get Adobe Reader
Adobe Acrobat Reader is required to view PDF files. This is a free program available from the Adobe web site.
Follow the download directions on the Adobe web site to get your copy of Adobe Acrobat Reader.

 

© 2017 Quintessence Publishing Co, Inc

IJP Home
Current Issue
Ahead of Print
Archive
Author Guidelines
About
Accepted Manuscripts
Submission Form
Submit
Reprints
Permission
Advertising
Quintessence Home
Terms of Use
Privacy Policy
About Us
Contact Us
Help