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The International Journal of Adult Orthodontics & Orthognathic Surgery
(Published from 1986-2002)

Edited by Robert L. Vanarsdall, DDS and Raymond P. White, Jr, DDS, PhD

Continued by World Journal of Orthodontics.

ISSN 0742-1931

Publication:
The International Adult Orthodontics & Orthognathic Surgery
Summer
Volume 16, Issue 2

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Effect of orthognathic surgery on the temporomandibular joint in patients with anterior open bite

Behnam Aghabeigi, PhD, FDSRCS, FFDRCSI, David Hiranaka, MD, DMD, David A. Keith, BDS, FDSRCS, DMD, John P. Kelly, MD, DMD, St. John Crean, BDS, MBBS, FRCS(OMFS), FDSRCS

This study examined the prevalence of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) signs and symptoms in patients with anterior open bite. The influence of orthognathic surgery on the TMJ in these patients and the interaction of occlusal and psychologic variables on the presence and/or persistence of pain was studied. A retrospective survey of 83 patients with an anterior open bite who underwent orthognathic surgery was carried out. Records were examined for the prevalence of abnormal TMJ signs and symptoms, including pain. A survey was mailed to these patients that consisted of: (1) the TMJ Scale, (2) the Symptom Checklist 90 (SCL90), (3) the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and (4) a visual analog scale on which patients indicated their degree of satisfaction with the procedure. Thirty-seven (42%) patients responded to the survey, and 13 (15%) also attended a clinical and radiographic examination. Multiple regression analysis was used for statistical analysis of the factors contributing to the presence and/or persistence of pain. In the preoperative group, the prevalence of pain was 32%, dysfunction 40%, and limitation of opening 7%. Age and gender were significantly associated with the presence of pain. The overall prevalence of abnormal TMJ signs and symptoms was not significantly different after orthognathic surgery. An abnormal psychologic profile was the most significant factor associated with the presence and/or persistence of pain. It is concluded that that the prevalence of temporomandibular disorders in anterior open bite patients increases with age, is significantly higher in females, and is not influenced by other occlusal variables. Furthermore, orthognathic surgery does not significantly influence temporomandibular disorders in patients with anterior open bite. Female patients, particularly those with an abnormal psychologic profile, are at a higher risk of persistent postoperative TMJ pain. (Int J Adult Orthod Orthognath Surg 2001;16:153160)

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