Home Subscription Services
 
   

 
The American Journal of Esthetic Dentistry
OCTE Home Page
About the Editor
Editorial Board
Accepted Manuscripts
Submit
Author Guidelines
Submission Form
Reprints / Articles
Permissions
Advertising
MEDLINE Search
 
 
 
 
 
FacebookTwitterYouTube
Quintessence Publishing: Journals: AJED

 

The American Journal of Esthetic Dentistry

Edited by Richard J. Simonsen, DDS, MS

ISSN 2162-2833 (print) • ISSN 2162-2841 (online)

Publication:
The American Journal of Esthetic Dentistry
Fall 2011
Volume 1 , Issue 1

Back
Share Abstract:

Determining the Influence of Flowable Composite Resin Application on Cuspal Deflection Using a Computerized Modification of the Strain Gauge Method

Hamdi H. Hamama, BDS, MDS/Nadia M. Zaghloul, BDS, MDS, PhD/Ossama B. Abouelatta, BEng, MSc Engg, PhD/Abeer E. El-Embaby, BDS, MDS, PhD

Pages: 48-59

This study evaluated the influence of the application of flowable composite resin on cuspal deflection using a computerized modification of the strain gauge method. Forty sound extracted mandibular molars, which received a mesio-occlusodistal slot preparation, were divided into two groups of 20 molars each based on the type of restorative materials used. Each group was further divided into two subgroups of 10 molars each relative to the application of flowable composite resin at cavity internal line angles. Cuspal deflection was measured using a new computerized modification of the strain gauge method. The mean cuspal deflection values (µm/m) and standard deviations were calculated and subjected to normality and homogeneity of variances tests. If they passed the tests, they were subjected to parametric statistical analysis (independent sample t test). The results showed that groups containing flowable composite resin exhibited higher cuspal deflection values than groups without flowable composite resin. The application of flowable composite resin at the internal cavity line angles increased cuspal deflection, possibly due to the material’s high volumetric shrinkage levels, which exerted more stress at the tooth-restoration interface. Further, the validity of the new computerized modification of the strain gauge method was proven by the agreement found between the output results and those of previous studies of cuspal deflection. (Am J Esthet Dent 2011;1:48–59.)

Full Text PDF File | Order Article

 

 
Get Adobe Reader
Adobe Acrobat Reader is required to view PDF files. This is a free program available from the Adobe web site.
Follow the download directions on the Adobe web site to get your copy of Adobe Acrobat Reader.
  © 2014 Quintessence Publishing Co Inc
 

Home | Subscription Services | Books | Journals | Multimedia | Events | Blog
Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | About Us | Contact Us | Advertising | Help | Sitemap | Catalog